Month: March 2019

Retirement income

Plan to enjoy the kind of lifestyle you want in later life

‘Will I be able to afford the retirement lifestyle I want?’ is a question that many people ask but struggle to figure out. There are many ways to assess your likely income in retirement and work out how much you need to put away now to enjoy the kind of lifestyle you want in later life. This is why more and more people, where appropriate, are turning to private pensions as a tax-effective way to build or enhance their retirement income.

To downsize, or not to downsize?

Planning your next move for a comfortable retirement

It can be a daunting prospect to think about selling the family home, but it is a decision that many decide is the right choice for them once the children have long moved out and the upkeep seems too onerous. However, people don’t often consider the impact this could have on their retirement, according to new research[1].

Double whammy

New social phenomenon – the ‘sandwich generation’

In recent years, a growing realisation has formed that we’re in the middle of a new social phenomenon – the ‘sandwich generation’. The term ‘sandwich generation’ is often used to refer to those who care for both sick, disabled or older relatives and dependent children.

The time is now

A much needed boost to the nation’s savings

A million more women in their 20s could be saving adequately for retirement if they were able to access emergency cash from their pension, according to new research[1]. The latest Women & Retirement report highlights that the current lack of flexibility in pensions is a barrier to saving and that introducing the ability to access funds for unexpected bills could provide a much-needed boost to the nation’s savings.

Financial freedom

Experiencing a golden age without money worries

Saving enough during our working life will not just give us freedom to manage our finances more flexibly, but it will also help us to secure a more comfortable lifestyle in retirement. Even though the baby boomers (the generation born between 1946 and 1964) are better off than any other generation, according to a new report[1], one in three (33%) people nearing retirement in this age demographic still don’t feel confident they’ll have enough funds to live on[2].